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crownofeternity

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Reply with quote  #16 

Alan Watts' - The Book and The Way of Zen were also huge for me.  In fact Alan Watts was definitely one of the first thinkers of Eastern thought that I was exposed to.  In hind site, it is very fortunate that I was grounded for much of my teen years where my only allowed activities were school, homework, practicing music and reading.  I had come across Alan Watts through an Alan Ginsburg interview.  His writings and recorded lectures really helped to direct my early spirituality.  

Great list by the way Michael!  I have not read a lot of those yet.  I also love that Stanislav Grof book.  It is wonderful for furthering the map of my understanding of consciousness.  


I do have a scan of that Johannes Heimrath book. I am not sure what the proper etiquette is.  Does anyone on here have a relationship with him?  
I love using the elements as a framework for approaching my sessions.  I know he is talking a lot about the Sound Creation gongs in that book, but I feel that all of the elements can be applied to whatever gong I am working with - ie.  Fire type strokes or Air strokes etc.


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Mike Tamburo
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Reply with quote  #17 
I have read many books on "sound healing" and closely related topics, of varying worth. Many were the weak predecessors of today's internet drivel; some were pretty good; some literally unfathomable (perhaps due to translation issues and/or bad pseudo-scientific gibberish) and some were great on certain subjects and poor on others (often reflecting the "science of the time," in an attempt for legitimacy, or something. My favorite selections are found in various places in the Seth Material books by Jane Roberts, esp. The Nature of Personal Reality. Very deep and insightful content, delivered clearly in modern English and intended for contemporary readers.
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Steve Sklar
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Reply with quote  #18 
FYI, when a book is out of print your home public or academic library can often borrow it for you through interlibrary loan. This service accesses the World Catalog (worldcat) and has the ability to borrow across state and country borders. Not every title will always be available, nor will the owning library necessarily be willing to loan it, but its worth a try. In many if not most cases, there is minimal or no charge to the individual requesting the book. The borrowing period for the item is set by the loaning institution, not by your home library.

Also, the scanned and sharing of such copies may very well be a violation of copyright; the ins and outs of that were never my area of expertise. If it is not done publicly, and the content is not used for material gain or public dissemination, you may be ok. And as far as I know, using the material and giving proper credit (end/foot notes, etc.) would be appropriate in quoting within your own work.
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9ways

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Reply with quote  #19 
Many great resources have been offered here. I'd like to say 'thank you' to everyone who listed their books. These resources are valuable for newcomers, and 'experts' alike. I saw 'Spiral Gypsy' above and I'm going to weigh in on Heimrath's book. To me, this book is very dated, and should probably be revised. I found nothing in this book valuable, and found dozens of questionable material and facts. The book is very pro Paiste' and not pro Gong, I find this slanted. It's not unusual for books to be poorly researched. His take on 'sound healing' with the Gong made some fair points, but this is far from being a bible like so many people have said. This past Summer I read practically every word that Dan Rudhyar wrote, including writers who have written articles about him in peer reviewed journals. I was not impressed, but I respect him. Two things stuck out to me regarding his philosophy of the Gong. (1) the harmonic series has NOTHING to do with resonance, and (2), the sounding board in a piano, serves the same function of a Gong. After reading this I felt, he had no understanding of the Gong and music theory. His entire written works were donated to Syracuse University, and are available in the library there. My opinion, Heimrath and Rudhyar are not the pinnacle of Gong wisdom. Now everyone is free to shoot the messenger.
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Throatsinger

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Reply with quote  #20 

Mitch, Rudhyar didn't have much resonance for me, either. I thought he served the same purpose as an out of tune string in a piano.

Not familiar with Heimrath.

I used to have a fairly large collection of books on sound healing. Got rid of most long ago. Felt that time playing, listening and exploring far outweighed equal time spent reading the vast majority of 'em.


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Steve Sklar
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crownofeternity

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Reply with quote  #21 
Rudhyar is not my favorite either. He uses way too many words without really saying much. Others I know have said that they have gotten a lot out of him. Don Conreaux learned a lot from him, so I gave it a chance. More importantly to me, Rudhyar's own musical compositions feel very stiff and they do not really reflect what he has written about sound. It always felt kind of cold. He certainly had no idea how to swing.

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Mike Tamburo
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Reply with quote  #22 

Quote:
Originally Posted by crownofeternity
Rudhyar is not my favorite either. He uses way too many words without really saying much.

I picked up his "The Magic of Tone and the Art of Music" in 1985 or 86 - over 30 years ago, and don't think I've ever finished reading it, though I've attempted at least several times.

Yes, way too many words without saying much, slow going and dense if I recall correctly. However I will say that when I take it off the shelf and open it up randomly and read a few passages, I often find an interesting thought or perspective that one is unlikely to find in any other 'sound healing' book. In fact I just did so now and read an interesting idea on avant-garde musicians, improvisation and freedom, and "fear to assume responsibility as an individual and of an unwillingness or inability to trust an inner source of power." And then that leads into thoughts on meditation. Can't say I agreed entirely with his perspective but thought provoking nonetheless.


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