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HimalayanBowls

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Reply with quote  #1 
This is a thread for assessment / sharing of instrument pictures. If anyone needs an assessment or wants to share a special instrument, add questions and pictures here. Do you assess objects? I offer free assessment for all types of metal instruments, especially singing bowls, bells, gongs. Also any Asian metal object, especially bronzes. I'm also a bit of an expert with drums and stringed instruments like violins and guitars.
Other group members are serious instrument experts as well. So if anyone has questions or wants to know more about an instrument in your possession, ask questions and post pictures. Also show off special items in your collection.
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bob dulang

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Reply with quote  #2 
Here is an unusual new instrument called the yaybahar, created by Görkem Sem of Turkey.  It has a sort of spike fiddle attached to spring reverb devices made from frame drums, similar to what Rich Goodhart does with his banjo. The reverb springs are attached directly to the strings at the bottom, it appears.  It has a haunting, ethereal sound.  There are videos of it on youtube.

  yaybahar.jpg

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HimalayanBowls

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Very cool. I've heard Rich's banjo. Interesting way to expand what an instrument can do.
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HimalayanBowls

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Reply with quote  #4 
Thought you guys might find this interesting: a group of small antique singing bowls, 4.25"-5", arranged by pitch from low on the left to high on the right. You can see the yellow papers at the top indicating the tone of each column of bowls. C on the left to D an octave up on the right. The bowls are lined up in columns so each line of bowls is the same tone (or thereabouts). Interestingly the distribution of tones creates rather a bell curve - that's the part I thought you might like. These are all about the same size and most pitches are quite well represented. However, it shows that tones in the B-C range are rather more rare in the small sizes. That's pretty true, just as E is a bit more rare in the large size antiques. There's some but not in large numbers as there are A and F tones.

Attached Images
jpeg image.jpg (210.17 KB, 11 views)

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RichG

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Reply with quote  #5 
Joseph,
Among the new bowls you sell are the brightly "polished gold color" ones.
By what process are they given that polished gold color, which seems to be a non-tarnishing finish?
Is it an electrolytic process, or a chemical finish that keeps them that shiny and bright?

(Personally, I am not a fan of that look, prefering the 'classic bronze', though I did get one from you about five years ago.)

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at the Omega Institute - May 31 - June 2, 2019
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bob dulang

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Reply with quote  #6 
Some of you may be familiar with the work of Harry Partch.  He was a curmudgeonly pioneer of experimental instruments and music, and worked with a 43-note microtonal scale.  His understudy, Ben Johnston, is also worth a look.  Harry saw the 12-note scale as a musical conspiracy.

Here is a page that has photos of a number of Harry's instruments.  Navigation is at the bottom.  This site has a wealth of information about him.  Youtube also has a documentary.

http://www.corporeal.com/instbro/instintr.html

here is some other odd stuff:

http://www.anaphoria.com/musinst.html

enjoy!
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HimalayanBowls

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Reply with quote  #7 
It's not any kind of process on the gold ones - they're just buffed. My bronze ones go through an artificial patina process.

I think only the cheap brass bowls are plated or embossed. Those are the ones with the perfect round shape, often with lots of decorations - designs on the outside and raised designs on the inside. These are usually plated with white metal or can be embossed with copper or other metals.

My new singing bowls are the hand hammered bronze bowls, what I consider to be the most authentic singing bowls made today. Below you can see why - I took a couple of side by side pictures with new bowls and antiques. 

The polished gold are buffed to a shine. You're right they don't tarnish - also good antique bronze doesn't tarnish when polished. They do get a ruddy glow after some time. I wish I could see what they look like after 100 years but the oldest one I have is only about 9 years old. Below are a couple of pictures to show more.

The first photo shows one of my new hand hammered polished gold bowls on the left and an antique that I polished on the right. The new bowl I've had since 2008 and it's still bright. The antique I polished at least 10 years ago and it's still like gold. You can see they're nearly identical. The bronze in the new bowls is actually identical to the antiques. They both hold a polish extremely well. 

The second photo shows one of my new hand hammered classic bronze singing bowls on the left and a typical antique on the right. The antique has been cleaned, so it's not a very deep patina, but you can still see how similar they are. The classic bronze bowl has an artificial patina which is applied and made permanent with heat. They will continue to oxidize and get a deeper natural patina over time. The color is very similar to the antiques, only slightly more yellow when they're new. 

My engraved bronze bowls have a final step of drawing the Tibetan designs. This is also a permanent coloration set by an additional kiln firing. I find the engraved bowls are slightly more brittle and have a slightly different tone (very slight difference). This is likely due to the additional heating. That also may be why the gold bowls hold the record for the longest ringing tone. Without the additional kiln firing the gold ones have the brightest and longest ringing tone (it's a very very slight difference - I don't know how many people would notice).

Pictures: 
 image1.JPG 
Gold bowls: New bowl on left, 18th century polished antique on right

image2.JPG 
Patina bowls: New bowl on left, 18th century antique (slightly cleaned) on right




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RichG

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Reply with quote  #8 

The spring/frame drum set up is well suited to the cello-like instrument that Gorkem Sen uses, pictured above. He has several versions of the instrument, at least one which has four springs and drum resonators. My sonic results are very different than his.

Here's another video of my Cosmi-Sonic Trance Banjo live in action, different performance than the one posted elsewhere on this forum.
It's worth noting that what you see is what you are getting: three close mics, mixed hard left, center and hard right.
NO ELECTRONIC EFFECTS OR REVERB WERE USED. 
It's all the springs and drum heads.

Also, this piece is a spontaneous improvisation throughout - unplanned, unstructured in advance.
LISTEN WITH HEADPHONES!!! [cool]


__________________

Sound Medicine Expansive Weekend Retreat!!
at the Omega Institute - May 31 - June 2, 2019
Please consider joining us!!!
http://www.richgoodhart.com/omega2019.php
[2019-GOODHART_OMEGA-Banner_002_72smaller] 

Rich Goodhart
http://www.richgoodhart.com
http://www.facebook.com/Rich-Goodhart-Music-118609091489499/
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3EDI7L60GcsDD7Ab1fdDMw

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HimalayanBowls

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Reply with quote  #9 
That sounds amazing. How did you ever get the idea to do it?
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